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Zsuzsanna Ozsvath
Endowed Chair-Arts & Humanities, Professor-Mathematical Sciences, Department of
Office MailstopMail Box: JO31, JO5116, Room No.: JO5.116 
Email Address  Zsuzsanna.Ozsvath@utdallas.edu    Primary Phone Number 972-883-2758    URL Ozsvath's Webpage    Media Contact
 Professional Preparation
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 DegreeMajorInstitutionYear
 Ph.D.German Language and LiteratureUniversity of Texas at Austin1968
 Concert DiplomaPianoState Academy of Music at Hamburg1961
 Final DiplomaPianoBartók Béla School of Musical Arts1955
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  YearPublication  Type
forthcoming
"Tractatus on Laziness" (with M. Satz), translation of Peter Esterhazy, "A lustasagrol: Tractatus," The Partisan Review, 2 (1989): 247-51 "In a Country Village," from Rebellious Women, (with M. Satz), translation of Margit Kaffka, "Falun," from Lazado Asszonyok, Confrontation (forthcoming)
Other
2006
“Trauma and Distortion: Holocaust Fiction and the Ban on Jewish Memory.” The Holocaust in Hungary: Sixty Years after. Ed. R. Braham. New York: Columbia UP (2006).
Other
2005
(Invited to publish) “Foreseeing Destruction: Visions of Catastrophe in the Poetry of Miklós Radnóti,” Interdisciplinary Literary Studies (Fall 2005).
Other
2004
József Kiss, “Against the Tide” (with Fred Turner), Judaism (Vol 53, Winter-Summer 2004), 82-3.
Other
2003
Gyula Illyés, Blood Kin” (with Fred Turner), in The Hungarian Quarterly (Vol. 44, Spring 2003, pp. 3-4).
Other
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DurationRankDepartment / SchoolCollege / OfficeUniversity / Company
2003-PresentThe Leah and Paul Lewis Chair of Holocaust Studies  University of Texas at Dallas
1998-PresentProfessor  University of Texas at Dallas
1990-1990Acting Associate DeanSchool of Arts and Humanities University of Texas at Dallas
1988-1998Associate Professor  University of Texas at Dallas
1985-1988Master of the School of Arts and Humanities  University of Texas at Dallas
1985-PresentResponsible for the fund raising activities of the Holocaust board   
1983-1988Assistant Professor  University of Texas at Dallas
1982-1983Visiting Professor  University of Texas at Dallas
1980-1982Senior Lecturer  University of Texas at Dallas
1976-1980Lecturer  University of Texas at Dallas
1969-1979Assistant Professor  Bishop College, Dallas, Texas
1968-1969Teacher  Hockaday School of Dallas
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 Additional Information
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AWARDS
  • Award winner, the Gjenima Prize for Literature, The Society of Albanian-Americans, 2005.
  • Award winners (with Fred Turner) of the Frankfurt Book Fair 1999 with the Iron-Blue Vault.
  • Award winners (with Fred Turner) of the Milan Füst Literary Award, National Academy of Sciences, 1995 Dec. (The most prestigious literary award in Hungary).
  • IREX Award for Research, 1991
  • Fulbright Award for Research, 1990

NOMINATIONS
  • Pushcart Award for Translation, 1986.
  • Amoco Award, University of Texas at Dallas, 1985.

HONORS
  • The Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs has asked for her permission to print her translation (with Fred Turner) of Atilla Jozsef’s poem “Sitting Standing, Killing, Dying” on placards created by Hungarian artists for the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the European Union. After this international celebration, these placards were displayed for two months in the cars and metro stations at Washington D C.
  • On March 7, 2005 her book, In the Footsteps of Orpheus, was introduced in the Hungarian Academy of Sciences by Professor László Rónay and Professor Mária Ormos, member of the Academy of Sciences.
  • November 16, 2003, she has been honored with the title: The Leah and Paul Lewis Chair of Holocaust Studies at UTD.
  • December 1, 2001, she has been elected “Outside Member” by the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  • Her volume of translations (with Fred Turner) The Iron-Blue Vault: Major Poems of Attila József. Newcastle upon Tyne: Bloodaxe Books,1999, has been found as one of the “ten best poetry books” published by Bloodaxe, and as one of the 100 most beautiful poetry books of the twentieth century by the National Book Club in Brazil.
  • Invited (with Fred Turner) by the Hungarian government, and personally, by the Hungarian Minister of Education and Culture, to participate with the volume The Iron-Blue Vault: Major Poems of Attila József (with Fred Turner) in the Frankfurt Book Fair, October 1999.
  • Recipient (with Fred Turner) of the Milan Füst Prize of the Hungarian Academy Sciences, December 1995.
  • Invited Fellow of the Dallas Institute of the Humanities and Culture, 1995.

TRANSLATION OF HER BIOGRAPHY ON RADNOTI
  • Translation of Zsuzsanna Ozsváth’s book, In the Footsteps of Orpheus: The Life and Time of Miklós Radnóti, into Hungarian. Trans. Miklós Hernadi; Publisher: Akademiai Kiadó (Academic Press), Dec. 2004.

EDITORIAL
  • Invited by Syracuse University Press to review a book on Holocaust memory (August 2009).
  • Invited by The American Historical Review to review a book on the Hungarian prime minister, Pál Teleki (August 2009).
  • Invited by Rowman and Littlefield Publishers Inc. to review a book on present day anti-Semitism (February 2009).
  • Invited by Syracuse University Press to review a manuscript on the German-Jewish philosopher E. Fackenheim (March, 2007).
  • Invited by Palgrave Publisher to review a manuscript that deals with several novels revolving around the “Kindertransport,” March, 2004.
  • Invited by Washington University Press to review a manuscript on the theological issues surrounding the Holocaust, December, 2004.
  • Invited by the editors of Studies in Polish Jewry: Polin to write about Jewish Budapest, October, 2004.
  • Invited by Wayne University Press to review books submitted for publication, 2002.
  • Associate Editor and East European Editor of Common Knowledge 1990-

Achievements in original investigation
  • PUBLICATIONS
    • Books
      • When the Danube Ran Red, accepted for publication by Syracuse University Press, June 2009.
      • Orpheus Nyomában: Radnóti Miklós élete és kora. Budapest: Akademiai Kiado, 2004 (Hungarian translation of In the Footsteps of Orpheus: the Life and Times of Miklós Radnóti. Bloomington: Indiana UP 2000).
      • In the Footsteps of Orpheus: the Life and Times of Miklós Radnóti. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2000-2001.
      • The Iron-Blue Vault: Attila József, Selected Poems (with F. Turner). New Castle upon Tyne: Bloodaxe, 1999.
      • Foamy Sky: The Major Poems of Miklós Radnóti (with Fred Turner). Budapest: Corvina, 2000 (expanded edition of Princeton: UP, 1992).
      • Foamy Sky: The Major Poems of Miklós Radnóti (with F.Turner). Princeton: Princeton University Press, l992.
    • Essays in Anthologies:
      • “Foreseeing Destruction: Visions of Catastrophe in the Poetry of Miklós Radnóti.” Comparative Central European Culture ed. Steven Tötösy Zepetnek, West Lafayette: Perdue UP (forthcoming, 2010), 35 pages.
      • “From Country to Country: My Search for Home.” Writer Uprooted: Jewish Exile Literature. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2008, 40 pp.
      • “Trauma and Distortion: Holocaust Fiction and the Ban on Jewish Memory.” The Holocaust in Hungary: Sixty Years After. Ed. R. Braham. New York: Columbia UP (2006), 337-48.
      • “Radnóti, Celan, and the Holocaust in Eastern-European Poetry.” In Comparative Cultural Studies and Post-1989 Central European Culture. West Lafayette: Purdue UP, 2002, 51-69.
      • “Paul Celan,” “Jerzy Kosinski,” “Miklós Radnóti,” and “Nelli Sachs,” in Encyclopedia of Holocaust Literature, eds. David Patterson and Alan Berger, (Westport-London: Oryx Press, 2002), 27-30; 52-54; 68-70.
      • “From Cain to Nahum: Shifts and Changes in Radnóti’s Poetic Vision.” Eds. George Gömöri and Clive Wilmer. In The Life and Poetry of Miklós Radnóti: Essays. New York: Columbia UP, 1999. 43-62. (Reprint of "From Cain to Nahum: Shifts and Changes in Radnóti's Poetic Vision," Hungarian Studies (A Journal of the International Association of Hungarian Studies) (1996), 11:29-44.
      • “Can Words Kill? Anti-Semitic Texts and Their Impact on the Hungarian Jewish Catastrophe.” In Studies on the Holocaust in Hungary: Fifty Years After. Ed. R. Braham. Eastern European Monographs. New York: Columbia UP, 1997, 79-116..
    • Essays in Journals (or on line)
      • (Invited to publish) “The Games We played” (from When the Danube Ran Red) . In The Sewanee Review (2010).
      • (Invited to publish) “Visions of Ctastrophe in the Poetry of Miklós Radnóti,” CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture 11.1 (March 2009). On line: http:// docs.lib.purdue.edu/clcweb/vol11/1221/.
      • (Invited review) Géza Komoróczy, Jewish Budapest, Polin, http://aapjs.org/reviews.shtml (April16, 2008).
      • (Invited review) Kati Marton, The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2006. Congress Monthly (June 2007),
      • (Invited review) Tim Cole, Holocaust City: The Making of a Jewish Ghetto (Routledge: New York and London, 2003), in Holocaust and Genocide Studies (2006), 20: 3, 515-18.
      • (Invited 21view) “Trauma and Distortion: The Ban on Jewish Memory in Hungary,” Congress Monthly (January 2006), 11-15.
      • "Central European Panorama" Szivarvany (Rainbow), 1987: 147-50
      • "The Moribund Revolution," 50 Congresso Mondiale, P.E.N. Club International, (Lugano, 1987): 173-74.
      • "Program Notes on Paul Celan" (Department of Music, The University of Wisconsin,Milwaukee, 1987): 4-8
      • "The Audacity of Expressing the Inexpressible: The Relation Between Moral and Aesthetic Considerations in Holocaust Literature" (with M. Satz), Judaism, 34 (1985): 197-210
      • "'The Problem of Posterides: Dilemmas of Translating Hungarian Literature" (with M. Satz), Legerete, II. Hungarian Issue (1985): 24-32
      • "The Lost Game: Playful Ambitions of Adolescence in Le Grand Meaulnes, Les Enfants terribles, and Utas és holdvilág," Arts Inquiry, 1.2 (1983): 3-9
      • "Thomas Mann's Family of Brothers: Familiar, Unexpected, and Distant Kin," Research Studies, 51. (1983): 25-35
      • "Brecht's The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny and The Good Woman of Setzuan: Beyond Marxism," Hartford Studies in Literature, 13.3 (1982): 278-86
      • "László Németh's Revulsion: Violence and Freedom," The Canadian American Review of Hungarian Studies, 6.2 (1979): 67-78
      • "The Hunger Artist and 'In the Penal Colony' in the Light of Schopenhauerian Metaphysics" (with Martha Satz), German Studies Review, 1.2 (1978): 200-210
    • Poetry in Exhibition Catalogue:
      • Without Knocking, 10 poem-translation of Atilla József (with Fred Turner) in the catalogue of the Exhibition of the Paintings of Janet Brooks Gerloff, inspired by the poems of Atilla József. April 11 – June 12, 2005, Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest.
    • Poetry in Anthologies:
      • Miklós Radnóti, “Forced March, in Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing, Eds. Edgar V. Roberts and Henry E. Jacobs, 9th edition, Prentice Hall, 2009.
      • Miklós Radnóti, “Peace, Dread” and “Razglednicas” II and IV (with Fred Turner), in Modern Classics from Hungary, Hungarian Book Foundation, 2001, 33.
      • Miklós Radnóti, “I Know Not What . . .,” “Fragment,” and “The Seventh Eclogue” (with Fred Turner), in The Lost Rider: A Bilingual Anthology, The Corvina Book of Hungarian Verse Budapest: Corvina, 1998, pp. 329-35.
      • Miklós Radnóti, “Neither Memory Nor Magic” (with Fred Turner), in The Colonnade of Teeth: Modern Hungarian Poetry. New Castle upon Tyne: Bloodaxe, 1996, 64-5.
      • “Miklós Radnóti,” (with Fred Turner) in Ed. Lawrence Langer. Art from the Ashes: A Holocaust Anthology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. l995, 18-34.
    • Poetry Advertised on Billboards, in the Metro and the Busses of Washington:
      • Attila József, “Sitting, Standing, Killing, Dying” (with Fred Turner) was affixed on billboards for two months in the metro and busses of Washington, representing Hungarian poetry on the occasion of the 50-years anniversary of the European Union (2006-2007).
    • Poetry in Journals:
      • József Kiss, “Against the Tide” (with Fred Turner), Judaism (Vol 53, Winter-Summer 2004), 82-3.
      • Gyula Illyés, Blood Kin” (with Fred Turner), in The Hungarian Quarterly (Vol. 44, Spring 2003, pp. 3-4).
      • Jenő Heltai, “Among My Songs” (with Fred Turner), Quarterly of Light Verse (Spring- Summer, 2003), pp. 56-7.
      • Lőrinc Szabó,“Everything for Nothing” and “Dream of the One,” in The Hungarian Quarterly (Vol. 41, Autumn 2000, pp. 33-36).
      • Seventeen poems by Attila József (with Fred Turner), in The Hungarian Quarterly (Vol. 38, Winter 1997, pp. 36-46 and Vol. 39, Spring, 1998. 38-48), selections from the Iron-Blue Vault.
      • "Vague Ode" (with F. Turner), Partisan Review, (1990), 2
      • "Like Death" (with M. Satz), translation of Miklós Radnóti "Mint a halal," Mr. Cogito, 9:1 (1989).
      • "A la Recherche..." (with M. Satz), translation of Miklós Radnóti "A la Recherche...," Mr. Cogito, 9:1 (1989).
      • "Song" (with F. Turner), translation of Miklós Radnóti "Dal"; "Couplets of a Moonish Night" (with F. Turner), translation of Miklós Radnóti "Rimparok egy holdas ejszakan," Boulevard, 8:2, 14-5.
      • "Skin and Bone and Pain" (with F. Turner), translation of Miklós Radnóti "Csak csont, bor es fajdalom"; "Twenty-eight Years" (with F. Turner), translation of Miklós Radnóti "Huszonnyolc ev"; "The Second Eclogue" (with F. Turner), translation of Miklós Radnóti "Masodik ecloga"; "Love Poem" (with F. Turner), translation of Miklós Radnóti "Szerelmes vers"; "Neither Memory nor Magic" (with F. Turner), translation of Miklós Radnóti "Sem emlek sem varazslat"; "The Seventh Eclogue" (with Fred Turner), translation of Miklós Radnóti "Hetedik ecloga," The New Hungarian Quarterly, 29.112 (1988), 113-19
      • "Jewel" (with M. Satz), translation of Janos Pilinski "Az ekszer"; "Waiting for Miracles (with M. Satz), translation of Atilla Szepesi "Csodavarok"; "Silence" (with M. Satz), translation of Endre Veszi "A hallgatas," Webster Review, 14 (1989): 29-30
      • "Foamy Sky" (with F. Turner), translation of Miklós Radnóti, "Tajtekos eg," Poetry, 151.6 (1988): 491-92
      • "Letter to My Wife" (with F. Turner), translation of Miklós Radnóti, "Level a hitveshez," Poetry 151.6 (1988): 490-91
      • "Shimmering, but Darkening" (with M. Satz), translation of Zsuzsa Beney, "Csillog, de eltunik," Literary Review 31 (1988): 160-61
      • "After Creation" (with M. Satz), translation of Sándor Weöres, "A teremtes utan," Osiris, 24 (1987): 11
      • "Abandonment" (with M. Satz), translation of Sándor Weöres, "Elhagyatottsag," Osiris, 24 (1987): 13
      • "Blind Street" (with M. Satz), translation of Istvan Agh, "Vak utca," Osiris, 24 (1987): 3
      • "Old Wave" (with M. Satz), translation of Nagy Gaspar, "Reg' hullam," Osiris, 24 (1987): 5
      • "The Magicians Parade Under Our Castles" (with M. Satz), translation of Gyula Takats, "A varazslok vonulasa varaink alatt," Webster Review, 12 (1987): 87
      • "Vault" (with M. Satz), translation of Zsuzsa Albert, "Boltozat," Webster Review 12 (1987): 87
      • "A Sentence About Tyranny" (with M. Satz), translation of Gyula Illyés, "Egy mondat a zsarnoksagrol," Legerete 1 (1985): 33-38
      • "On a Shrieking Palm Tree" (with M. Satz), translation of Miklós Radnóti, "Zsivalygo palmafan" Legerete, 2. (1985): 22
      • "Twenty Years later" (with M. Satz), translation of Janos Vajda, "Husz ev mulva" Legerete, 2: 23
      • "Perhaps a Tree Grows Within Me . . ." (with M. Satz), translation of Sandor Csoori, "Talan egy fa no bennem," Sands (1984): 60
      • "Last Autumn" (with M. Satz), translation of Lajos Papp, "_szi el_zetes," Sands: 61
      • "Mad Stanzas" (with M. Satz), translation of Sándor Weöres, "Orult strofak" Sands: 62
    • Short Stories in Journals:
      • "Tractatus on Laziness" (with M. Satz), translation of Peter Esterhazy, "A lustasagrol: Tractatus," The Partisan Review, 2 (1989): 247-51 "In a Country Village," from Rebellious Women, (with M. Satz), translation of Margit Kaffka, "Falun," from Lazado Asszonyok, Confrontation
      • "Night," from Rebellious Women (with M. Satz), translation of Margit Kaffka, "Este," from "Este," from Lazado Asszonyok, Wind: Literary Magazine 17 (1987), 97-103
      • "Miriam," from Rebellious Women (with M. Satz), translation of Margit Kaffka, "Miriam" from Lazado Asszonyok, North American Mentor Magazine, 25.1 (1987): 17-20
      • "In the Summer Kitchen," from Colors and Years (with M. Satz), translation of Margit Kaffka, "Nyari Konyha" from Szinek es evek, Pacific Quarterly Moana 9.2 (1985): 23-29
      • "Black Christmas" from Rebellious Women (with M. Satz), translation of Margit Kaffka, "Fekete karacsony" from Lazado Asszonyok, Legerete 2 (1985): 42-58. (Nominated for the Pushcart Prize, 1986)
      • "Hanging from the Device" from Teacher . . .Please (with M. Satz), translation of Frigyes Karinthy, "Logok a szeren," from Tanar Ur kerem . . ., Legerete (see above): 19-22
      • "Intimidation Attempts" from Intimidation Attempts, translation of Hans-Jurgen Frolich, "Einschuchterungsversuche: from Einschuchterungsversuche, Mundus Artium, 9.2 (1979) 108-14
    • Interview:
      • “Akit olvasni kell az egész világon: Beszélgetés Radnóti amerikai forditójával, monográfusával” (“Whose Work the Whole World Must read: Discussion with Radnóti’s American translator and monographer”), Könyvhét (2009) 244.
      • "The Translator's Voice: An Interview With Ivan Sanders," Translation Review XV (1984): 1-4
  • POETRY SET INTO MUSIC
    • Her translation (with Fred Turner) of Sándor Petőfi’s poem “End of September” has been set into music by Denes Agay (2003) and has been published by Music Sales Corporation, New York, Fall 2003.
  • REVIEWS on ORPHEUS
    • In the Footsteps of Orpheus: The Life and Times of Miklós Radnóti, reviewed in Midstream (Apr. 2001), by Edward Alexander, Professor at Washington University; and in Judaism (Summer 2001), by David Patterson, Director of the Bornblum Judaic Studies Program at the University of Memphis. In addition, at least 14 reviews have appeared in 2001-2002, about the book, in major journals in Canada, Hungary, and the US. In Congress Monthly (journal of the American Jewish Congress), September/October, 2004, an article has been published by David M. Levine, “Radnóti’s Overcoat,” which discusses the life, death and poetry of Miklós Radnóti, referring to and evaluating In the Footsteps of Orpheus.
    • As for my monograph, it was translated into Hungarian by Miklos Hernadi, and published by Akademiai Kiado (Academic Press), in 2004. This book was discussed by numerous authors in news papers, literary journals, and public lectures as well as in the program of the Hungarian radio (Petofi) by the academician Maria Ormos and Laszlo Ronay, Professor of Hungarian Literature at the Eotvos Lorand University. In addition, Professor Ormos wrote a two page article about this book in Szombat, 2005, November XVII, 9.
  • REVIEW of THE HOLOCAUST IN HUNGARY
    • “Can Words Kill”? H-Net Book Review (December, 2006) reviewed by Gabor Szegedi, Department of American Studies, University of Budapest.
  • REVIEW OF THE WRITER UPROOTED: CONTEMPORARY JEWISH EXILE LITERATURE
    • Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies, (Fall 2009), Purdue UP. Reviewed by Ranen Omer-Sherman, University of Miami.
  • NEW MANUSCRIPTS
    • When the Danube Ran Red, 186 pages. Accepted for publication by Syracuse University Press.
    • Light within the Shade: 800 Years of Hungarian Poetry, 238 pages (with Frederick Turner), is submitted to and considered by Indiana University Press.
  • WORKS IN PROGRESS
    • Translation of a selection of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s major poetry (with Frederick Turner).
    • Translation of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s Faust (with Frederick Turner).
  • LECTURES
    • (A short list of some of Ozsváth’s lectures)
    • “When Darkness Fell over the World: The Holocaust in Hungary,” Keynote Speaker at the Commemoration of the Shoah at Memphis Jewish Federation, April 20, 2009.
    • “Just Walk on Condemned to Die,” Memphis University, April 21, 2009.
    • “Personal Stories about How the Christians Reacted to the Holocaust,” Dyersburg Book Fest 2008, Dyersburg State Community College, February 25, 2008.
    • “A Literary History of the Holocaust,” Dyersburger Book Fest, February 25, 2008, Dayersburg State Community College, February 25, 2008.
    • “The History and Literary Responses to the Holocaust,” Dyersburger Book Fest, February 26, 2008.
    • “The Tale of Hatred: Anti-Semitism over the Ages,”Congregation Sherith Israel, January 12, 2008.
    • “To Be a Jew in Hungary: Eli Wiesel’s Night in Context.” “Common Reading Program.” El Centro College, Dallas, Texas, February 1, 2007.
    • “When the World Burned: Ten Months under German Occupation,” The Alvin E. Sasso Lecture Series, Florida Atlantic University, March 18, 2007.
    • “Poems of Anguish: Radnoti’s Lyrics in Light of the Holocaust,” Anshai Torah, January 18, 2007.
    • “Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust,” Collin Country Community College, November 14, 2007.
    • “Art and Ideology: Poetry and Fiction in the 20th-Century” The Dallas Institute of the Humanities and Culture, April 3, 2006.
    • “From Contry to Country: My Search for Home,” “Writer Uprooted: A Conference on Contemporary Jewish Exile Literature,” Indiana University, Jewish Studies Program, March 22-24, 2006.
    • “More on Hungary and the Holocaust,” The University of Memphis, Jewish Studies Department, January 26, 2006.
    • “Sun Bedazzled, Dream Afflicted: The Poetry of Atilla Jozsef,” The University of Memphis, English Department, January 26, 2006.
    • “Jewish Responses to Catastrophe,” Shearith Israel, June 12, 2005.
    • “Oly korban eltem: Radnoti Miklos elete es munkassaga, at the Magyar Fulbright Egyesulet Budapest (Hungarian Fulbright Association, Budapest), May 27, 2005.
    • “Why to Teach about the Holocaust,” organized by the United States Holocaust Museum for “The Dallas Educators’ Forum,” January 13, 2005.
    • “Trauma and Distortion: Holocaust Fiction and the Ban on Memory in Hungary,” United States Holocaust Museum, March, 2004.
    • “The Holocaust in Hungary,” University of Memphis, Bornbaum Judaic Studies of the University of Memphis and the Memphis Jewish Historical Society, May 2, 2004.
    • ”The Dominion of Darkness: Anti-Semitism Over the Ages,” Part I, Beyt Midrash of North Texas, 6 lectures, January 2003-May 2003.
    • “Anti-Semitism in the Age of Enlightenment,” Part II, Beyt Midrash of North Texas, 6 lectures, September 2003-December 2003.
    • “Antisemitism from Ancient Times to the Third Reich,” The Dallas Holocaust Memorial Center, January 21, 2002.
    • “Sun-Bedazzled Dream-Afflicted: Passionate Hungarian Love Poetry,” UT Dallas, February 14, 2002.
    • Light within the Shade: Hungarian Poetry from Balassi to Radnóti,” Fészek Club, New York, April 10, 2002.
    • “The Poetry of Radnóti under the Shadow of the Holocaust,” The University of Dallas, March 21, 2002.
    • “The Holocaust,” Mini-Course, UTD Holocaust Studies Board, Three Sessions, March 3– April 20, 2002.
    • “Expressing the Inexpressible: Readings in the Literature of the Holocaust,” The Beyt Midrash of North Texas (Jewish Continuing Education), 2002, September-November.
    • “The Power of the Poetic Imagination,” the Dallas Institute, March 28, 2001.
    • “Growing up in Hungary” and “Responses to Atrocity: The Poetry of Miklós Radnóti,” The Robert A. and Sandra S. Borns Jewish Studies Program of Indiana University, Bloomington, both lectures on April 19, 2001
    • “On Translation,” Round-table discussion among translators, Budapest, organized by the Petőfi Museum and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, May 18, 2001
    • “Shedding Light on Shunshine: The Issue of Conversion in Hungary during the Interwar Period,” The Bornblum Judaic Studies Program of the University of Memphis at Memphis, Oct. 12, 2000.
    • “Jewish Culture and History in Poland,” The Presence of Absence, Jeff Gusky, Photographs, UTD, August 17-September 22, 2000.
    • “Dohnányi’s Budapest,” Lecture and Discussion at the Dohnányi Festival, Carnegie Hall, New York, January 18, 2000.
    • “The Lure of the Hero: Conflicts of Identity in the World of the Hungarian Poet Miklós Radnóti,” Lectures on Jewish Culture, Bridwell Library, SMU, November 15, 1998.
    • “The Choking Voice: Radnóti’s Poems on the Death March, November 1944,” lecture at the International Holocaust Conference “Lessons and Legacies” in Boca Raton, Florida, November 8, 1998.
    • “Lyrics of Resistance: The Last Poems of Miklós Radnóti (1909-1944),” Dallas Jewish Artfest, August 23, 1998.
    • “‘The White Cloud’ and the ‘Ruffled Sheep,’: Radnóti’s Lyrical Visions on the Death March” and “Patterns of Remembrance: The Role of the Past in Radnóti’s Camp Poetry,” two lectures presented at CAJE (The Coalition for the Advancement of Jewish Education), on August 9, 1998, San Antonio.
    • "Poems of Pain: Radnóti's Late Lyrics in the Context of the Holocaust," Invited Speaker at the Holocaust Literature Convention organized by A&M's Department of English and Foreign Languages, April 2-4, l997
    • "Can Words Kill? Anti-Semitic Texts and their Impact on the Hungarian Jewish Catastrophe," invited lecturer at the International Holocaust Conference in Hungary: "The Holocaust in Hungary: Fifty Years Later," April 5-7, 1994
    • "Forced March: Radnóti's Last Poems," April 17, 1996, invited lecturer at Dowling College, New York.
    • "The Heroic Poetry of Miklós Radnóti and Attila József," invited lecturer at The Dallas Institute for the Humanities and Culture, March l6, l996
    • "`Hard is the Firmament': A Discussion of Attila József's Poetry," invited lecturer at the Hungarian American Feszek Club, February, l996
    • "Bonhoeffer and the Jews," Invited Lecturer, at "The Martyrdom of Dietrich Bonhoeffer: A 50th Anniversary Commemoration," The Chapel of Thanksgiving at Thanks-Giving Square, April l8, l995
    • "The Schizophrenic Genius: The Poetic Visions of Attila József," Invited Speaker at the Program for Humanities in Medicine, Yale University, March 2, 1995
    • "From Cain to Isaiah: Shifts and Changes in Radnóti's Poetic Vision," invited lecturer at The International Radnóti Memorial Conference, Darwin College, Cambridge (Great Britain), December 5-6, 1994
    • "The Life and Work of Miklós Radnóti," lecture given on March 25, 1993, in New York, at the Hungarian-American "Feszek Club"
    • "Poems of Evil: Transformation and Restatement of the Classical Tradition in Miklós Radnóti's Work," the Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association, The University of Connecticut, April 6-7, l991
    • "Rising Out of Dust and Ashes," Holocaust Symposium, University of Texas at Dallas, April 1989
    • "In the Footsteps of Orpheus," University of Texas at Dallas, January 1989
    • “Radnóti's Works," University of Texas at Dallas, March 1988
    • "The Moribund Revolution," invited speaker at the meeting of the International PEN Club, 1987, Lugano, Switzerland
    • "The Problem of 'Posterides': Dilemmas of Translating Hungarian Literature," invited speaker at the Modern Language Association, 1983, New York
    • "The Audacity of Expressing the Inexpressible: The Relation Between Moral and Aesthetic Considerations in Holocaust Literature" (with M. Satz), North East Modern Language Association, 1982, New York
    • "What is the Price of Freedom? Thoughts on Laszlo Nemeth's Revulsion," invited speaker at the Modern Language Association, 1979, San Francisco
    • "Laszlo Nemeth's Revulsions: Violence and Freedom," invited speaker at the South Central Modern Language Association, 1979, New Orleans
    • "Brecht' The Good Woman of Setzuan: Beyond Marxism," invited speaker at the South Central Modern Language Association, 1978, Houston
    • Brecht's Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny and The Good Woman of Setzuan: Beyond Marxism," University of Texas at Dallas, June 1978
    • "The Two-Fold Concept of Man's Relation to the Universe in Western Thought: Reason versus Emotion," series of lectures, University of Texas at Dallas, Fall, 1975
    • "The Concept of Life and Death in the Works of Thomas Mann," series of lectures, University of Texas at Dallas, Spring 1971
  • Radio Shows: Invited Guest and Invited Speaker
    • Petofi Radio, Budapest. “Studies in Human Affairs,” May 17, 2005 (Interview, 12 minutes tape).
    • Kossúth Rádió Budapest. “A New World,” May 5, 2005 (Interview, 15 minutes tape).
    • Budapest, Kossúth Rádió Budapest, “In the Footsteps of Orpheus-Miklós Radnóti’s Life and Times.” Discussion, László Rónay and Mária Ormos, March 30, 2005.
    • New York, Museum of Modern Art, “Neither Memory nor Magic,” (documentary film” about Miklos Radnoti, 2008), interview, and her and Fred Turner’s translations of Radnoti’s poetry), February 22, 2009.
    • Budapest, Kossúth Rádió, “Radnóti and His Time,” interview, March 21, 2005.
    • Budapest, Petőfi Rádió, “Problems of Translation,” May 26, 2001.
    • KERA 90.1, “The Glenn Mitchell Show,” August 29, 2001.
    • Bartók Rádió, “Spheres,” December 2, 2001 (Interview, 20 minutes tape).

SERVICE
  • 2009-2010 Member of School Peer Review Committee
  • 2009-2010 Member of the Graduate Studies Committee
  • 2009 Chairperson of Sean Cotter’s Tenure Review
  • 2009 Member of Pamela Gossins Promotion Committee
  • 2009 Member of Nils Roemer Promotion Committee
  • 2008-2009 Member of the Personnel Committee
  • 2008-2009 Member of the Periodic Performance Committee
  • 2007 Member of the Chinese Search in Literature
  • 2006-2007 Member of the Peer Review Committee
  • 2006 Member of Sean Cotter’s Third-Year Review Committee
  • 2005- Member of the Committee of Qualification
  • 2005-6 Chairperson of the Jewish History Search
  • 2005-06 Member of the Guitar Search
  • 2004 Member of the Peer Review Committee
  • 2004 Member of the Graduate Studies Committee
  • 2003 Member of the Translation Search
  • 2002-03 Member of Peer Review Committee
  • 2001- Member of the Graduate Studies Committee
  • 2001-03 Member of Parking and Security
  • 1998 Sept.-2000 Member of Committee of Qualification
  • 1999 Sept. Member of Committee on Committees
  • 1999 Sept.-2000 Sept.Member of Parking and Security
  • 2000 Member of P. Michelson Ad Hoc Committee (A&H)
  • 2000 Member of Teresa Towner’s Ad Hoc Committee
  • 2000 Member of Nemata Blyden Ad Hoc Committee
  • 1999 Member of Erin Smith Ad Hoc Committee (GS)
  • 1999 Member of Pamela Rollins Ad Hoc Committee (HD)
  • 1997-99 Member of the Undergraduate TASK Force
  • 1997-99 Member of CEP
  • 1995-99 Member of the Planning and Budget Committee
  • 1994 Member of the Review Committee evaluating the School of Social Sciences
  • Member of the Review Committee Evaluating the School of Arts and Humanities
  • Member of the Development Committee
  • 1993 Member of the Review Committee Evaluating the Business School
  • 1984 – 1992 Member of the Academic Senate, The Graduate Task Force, the Planning and Budget Committee, and The Faculty Handbook Committee.
  • 1985 – 1989 Member of the Academic Council and The Graduate Studies Committee.
  • 1986- Responsible for the Endowment of the Arnold Jaffe Library Collection.
  • 1988-1993 Responsible for organizing the Sebel Symposium at UTD.
  • 1993-Present Responsible for organizing the annual Einspruch Holocaust Lecture Series that has brought to UTD such scholars and artists as David S. Wyman, Raul Hilberg, Yisrael Gutman, Jürgen Habermas,Saul Friedlander, Alvin Rosenfeld, John Cornwell, Jan Gross, David Patterson, István Szabó, David Roskies, Deborah Lipstadt, Geza Komoroczy, Alen Berger, Christopher Browning, Richard Breitman, Saul Friedlaender, and Robert Wistrich. In addition, she organized concerts at UTD for the Dallas Chamber Orchestra on the occasions of Yom Ha Shoah (“Day of the Catastrophe”), playing programs that consist of pieces by composers who were killed in the Holocaust.
  • She is working on the board of the Ackerman Center for Holocaust Studies, which is the umbrella organization of the Leah and Paul Louis Chair in Holocaust Studies, the Einspruch Holocaust Lecture Series, and the Jaffe Holocaust Collection. She is instrumental in securing significant funds for these various programs as well as for a number of scholarships.

REVIEWS ON ACTIVITIES RELATING TO THE CHAIR
  • “UTD Looks to Endow Holocaust Chair,” in Texas Jewish Post, May 29, 2003, pp. 1 and 9.

PERSONAL STATEMENT

Zsuzsanna Ozsváth is Director of the Holocaust Studies Program. She has published a number of articles, dealing with aesthetic and ethical issues in French, German, and Hungarian literature as well as with the relationship between art and totalitarian ideology. Since the eighties, she has undertaken several translation projects and worked on various branches of Holocaust Studies. 

In the field of translation, she started out with rendering and publishing a significant number of German and Hungarian poems and short stories in such journals as Poetry, Judaism, The Hungarian Quarterly, Partisan Review, The Webster Review, Literary Review, Osiris, Congress Monthly, just to mention a few. But the culmination of her work in this field have been three volumes of poetry (each with Fred Turner), involving some of the greatest poets of Hungary: Foamy Sky: The Major Poems of Miklós Radnóti (Princeton: UP, 1992 reprinted Budapest: Corvina, 2000, bilingual edition) The Iron-Blue Vault: Attila József, Selected Poems (New Castle upon Tyne: Bloodaxe, 1999), and a brand new, unpublished volume, Light among the Shade: Eight-Hundred-Years of Hungarian Poetry. 

Besides Ozsvath's translation projects, she has become involved in Holocaust Studies. Completed in November 1997, In the Footsteps of Orpheus: The Life and Times of Miklós Radnóti, 1909-1944 has been published by Indiana UP, 2000. Besides translating and writing a number of essays on Radnóti, Ozsváth has published several articles on such writers and poets of the Holocaust as Kosinski, Celan, Nelli Sachs, including several Hungarian Holocaust novelists. Her talk in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, "Trauma and Distortion: Holocaust Fiction and the Ban on Jewish Memory in Hungary" (2004, March), has been published in a volume Hungary 60 Years after, by Columbia UP 2006. Her talk at Indiana University, "From Country to Country: My Search for Home" (2006, March), was published in the volume The Writer Uprooted: Contemporary Jewish Exile Literature, by Indiana UP, 2008. Her article, "Playing during the Siege," was in the Sewanee Review, spring, 2010, and her new book, When the Danube Ran Red, by Syracuse Press, will appear in summer 2010.

Besides her translations and scholarly writings, Ozsvath is Associate Editor and East European Editor of Common Knowledge, a publication of Duke University Press. Invited speaker at a number of national and international professional conventions, she also is frequently interviewed by newspapers and television stations in this country as well as in Hungary. Furthermore, she consults with and is on the board of such professional, civic, and community organizations as the ZOA, the Educational Committee of the Jewish Federation, The Dallas Memorial Holocaust Center, and The David Wyman Institute for Holocaust Studies. 


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