Javascript must be enabled to use this form.

UTDallas Research Explorer
 View Profile
    Faculty Profile — Is this you? Login to edit.Last Modified Time: 10:38:35 PM Sat, 30 Oct 2010 
Image of  J.C.  Barnes
 Contact InformationHelpHelp  
J.C. Barnes
Assistant Professor-Economic, Political & Policy Sciences
Primary Phone Number 972-883-2046    Media Contact
 Professional Preparation
HelpHelp  
 DegreeMajorInstitutionYear
 Ph.D.Criminology & Criminal JusticeThe Florida State University2010
 M.A.Criminology & Criminal JusticeUniversity of South Carolina2006
 B.S.Criminology & Criminal JusticeUniversity of South Carolina2004
Collapse Section Expand Section Research and Expertise
HelpHelp  
RESEARCH INTERESTS
  • Biosocial criminology
  • Behavioral genetics
  • Life-course/developmental criminology
  • Applied quantitative analysis
  • Criminological theory testing
Collapse Section Expand Section Publications
HelpHelp  
 2 3 4 Next>> 14>>  
  YearPublication  Type
In Press
Deterrence and macro-level perceptions of punishment risks: Is there a “collective wisdom”? Crime & Delinquency.
Category: Crime & Delinquency
Peer reviewed
In Press
Do more police generate more crime deterrence? Crime & Delinquency.
Category: Crime & Delinquency
Peer reviewed
forthcoming
Barnes, J.C., Kristin Golden, Christina Mancini, Brian B. Boutwell, Kevin M. Beaver, and Brie Diamond* . Marriage and involvement in crime: A consideration of reciprocal effects in a nationally representative sample. Justice Quarterly. In Press.
Peer reviewed
forthcoming
Beaver, Kevin M., Brian B. Boutwell, J.C. Barnes, Joseph A. Schwartz, and Eric J. Connolly. A quantitative genetic analysis of the associations among language skills, peer interactions, and behavioral problems in childhood: Results from a sample of twins. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly. In Press.
Peer reviewed
forthcoming
Beaver, Kevin M., Joseph A. Schwartz, Joseph L. Nedelec, Eric J. Connolly, Brian B. Boutwell, and J.C. Barnes. Intelligence is associated with criminal justice processing: Arrest through incarceration. Intelligence. In Press.
Peer reviewed
Collapse Section Expand Section Affiliations
HelpHelp  
AFFILIATIONS
Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences
American Society of Criminology & Division of Experimental Criminology
International Association for Correctional and Forensic Psychology
Society for Research in Child Development
Southern Criminal Justice Association
Collapse Section Expand Section Appointments
HelpHelp  
DurationRankDepartment / SchoolCollege / OfficeUniversity / Company
PresentAssistant ProfessorCriminology ProgramSchool of Economic, Political & Policy SciencesThe University of Texas at Dallas
 News Articles
Prof Examines Nature-or-Nurture Side of Criminology
News Center at UT Dallas

 

Dr. J.C. Barnes, who studies how biology and the environment influence criminal behavior, has joined the faculty of UT Dallas’ School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences.Barnes recently moved to UT Dallas from Florida State University. Besides conducting a variety of research projects, the new assistant professor will teach undergraduate criminology courses and work with graduate students.
 
Barnes’ main area of research centers on the biological and genetic factors that underlie antisocial behavior. He seeks to identify whether genetic influences have an impact on an individual’s behavior or personality development.

Criminologist’s Research Shows Genes Influence Criminal Behavior
News Center at UT Dallas

Your genes could be a strong predictor of whether you stray into a life of crime, according to a research paper co-written by UT Dallas criminologist Dr. J.C. Barnes.
 
The study focused on whether genes are likely to cause a person to become a life-course persistent offender, which is characterized by antisocial behavior during childhood that can later progress to violent or serious criminal acts later in life.
 
Barnes and his co-researchers relied on data from 4,000 people drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to identify how people fell into each of the three groups. The researchers then compared the information using what is known as the twin methodology, a study design that analyzed to what extent genetic and environmental factors influenced a trait.
 
The analysis doesn’t identify the specific genes that underlie the different pathways, which Barnes said would be an interesting area for further research.

       Teaching HelpHelp  
toggle toggle Presentations
HelpHelp  
Presentations
  • Barnes, J.C.
  • 2009 Analyzing the impact of a statewide residence restriction law on South Carolina sex offenders. National Institute of Justice Conference. Arlington, VA.
  • Barnes, J.C. and Kevin M. Beaver
  • 2009 The mutual unfolding of self-regulation and externalizing behavioral problems: A biosocial analysis. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology in Philadelphia, PA.
  • Kleck, Gary and J.C. Barnes
  • 2009 Do more police generate more crime deterrence? Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology in Philadelphia, PA.
  • Barnes, J.C. and Kevin M. Beaver
  • 2008 An empirical examination of adolescence-limited offending: A direct test of Moffitt’s maturity gap thesis. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology in St. Louis, MO.
  • Barnes, J.C. and Holly V. Miller
  • 2008 If your friends jumped off a bridge, would you?: Differential association, peer influence, and delinquency. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology in St. Louis, MO.
  • Kleck, Gary and J.C. Barnes
  • 2008 Deterrence and macro-level perceptions of punishment risks: Is there a “collective wisdom?” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology in St. Louis, MO.
  • Barnes, J.C., J. Mitchell Miller, and Holly V. Miller
  • 2007 An examination of demeanor and juvenile drug court admission. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology in Atlanta, GA.
  • Barnes, J.C., J. Mitchell Miller, and Holly V. Miller
  • 2007 An examination of juvenile drug court admissions decisions: Analyzing the implications of demeanor source. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Criminal Justice Association in Savannah, GA.
  • Kurlychek, Megan and J.C. Barnes
  • Barnes 5
  • 2007 Performance enhancing drug use: Assessing motives, correlations and outcomes. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology in Atlanta, GA.
  • Miller, J. Mitchell, Christopher J. Schreck, Holly E. Ventura, and J.C. Barnes
  • 2006 Labeling, interaction, and crime control: An examination of factors influencing drug court admittance. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwestern Criminal Justice Association in Chicago, IL.

 Additional Information
HelpHelp  
Courses Taught

Advanced Criminology
Community Sanctions


Service
  • Manuscript Reviewer
  • International Criminal Justice Review
  • Journal of Criminal Justice Education
  • Journal of Quantitative Criminology
  • Justice Quarterly
  • Graduate Student Orientation Leader, College of Criminology & Criminal Justice, The Florida State University, 2009.
  • President, Alpha Phi Sigma (National Criminal Justice Honor Society, Xi Chapter), University of South Carolina, 2006 to 2007.
  • Treasurer, Alpha Phi Sigma (National Criminal Justice Honor Society, Xi Chapter), University of South Carolina, 2005 to 2007.
  • Managing Editor, Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 2005 to 2006.

HONORS & AWARDS
  • Graduate Student of the Year, Southern Criminal Justice Association, 2008.
  • Alpha Phi Sigma Student Paper Competition, 2nd Place, awarded at the annual meeting of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, 2007.
  • Juvenile Justice Section Student Paper Competition, 1st Place, Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, 2007.
  • Alpha Phi Sigma National Graduate Student Scholarship Competition, 1st Place, awarded at the annual meeting of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, 2006.
  • Distinguished High Honors on the Comprehensive Examination, Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice, University of South Carolina, 2006.

Please verify the information in this request and mention any changes or suggestions in the comments section. Email notifications and confirmations regarding this will be sent to you at fromEmail and the profile owner. If you would like to receive it at a different email address, please change the email address listed on your profile.
From:
Comments:
© 2017-2018 The University of Texas at Dallas About Explorer | Accessibility | Contact Explorer Team